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QC sorry for Dreamworld lawsuit comments

A senior barrister has apologised for accusing a law firm of compromising witness evidence at the inquest into the Dreamworld deaths.

Ken Fleming QC is assisting Coroner James MacDougall as he investigates the horrific deaths of four people on a ride at the Gold Coast theme park in 2016.

Outside the inquest on Thursday, Mr Fleming apologised for any imputation that might have arisen from his claim that Shine Lawyers had compromised witness evidence.

He'd earlier attacked the firm on ABC radio, saying it had compromised the evidence of former Dreamworld workers by announcing, while the inquest was still underway, that they would to sue the park for psychological trauma.

Mr Fleming also accused the law firm of "using the opportunity to build their own profile".

On his way into the inquest, Mr Fleming stepped back from those comments, and said those were his own views, not those of the coroner.

"In so far as there might be any imputation against Shine Lawyers that they have acted inappropriately or unprofessionally I unreservedly withdraw those and unreservedly apologise for those," he told reporters.

But he insisted it would have been better if the firm had waited until the inquest was over before announcing the ex-workers intended to sue for the harm they suffered as first responders to the deaths.

"It's entirely inappropriate to confuse this procedure with a common law procedure," Mr Fleming said.

Shine Lawyers defended its decision to announce the lawsuit, after Mr Fleming's initial comments.

"There were several casualties on the day, including our clients, who deserve a voice and recognition of their continuous grief," Shine said in a statement.

"Every person who suffers injury in the workplace is entitled to representation and support of the law."

The inquest continues on Thursday.

Cindy Low, Kate Goodchild, her brother Luke Dorsett and his partner Roozi Araghi died following a malfunction on the Thunder River Rapids ride in October 2016.

© AAP 2018